Research Requests

Welcome to the 9th Infantry Division Research part of my website. 

The main purpose of this website is to provide information about the World War 2 History of the great 9th Infantry Division and its men.

Besides updating this website, I am working on several other projects as well:

1. Book
For the last couple of years I have been doing extensive research about the 9th Infantry Division’s involvement in the Battle in the Hurtgen Forest area between September 1944 and February 1945, and writing a book about it. Planned publication is sometime in 2017.

2. 9th Infantry Division Missing In Action Project.
Together with the amazing help of 3 very dedicated friends, we are trying to find out more about the 9th Infantry Division men who went Missing In Action during World War 2. We try to find relatives, friends or documentation to provide information about a soldier who went Missing In Action. This way we are able to provide the names on the Wall of Missing at the various American Cemeteries a face and a story, so they won’t be forgotten. Visit the list of men here, and click on the names of those who have a Tribute Page to learn more about them: https://9thinfantrydivision.net/missing-in-action/.

3. Providing information about a soldier’s service.
Besides these main projects, I am also offering help in finding out more information about the World War 2 service of a soldier of the 9th Infantry Division.

Detailed unit history information.
Learn more about the unit your soldier served with. I will provide general information so you will get to understand the complete picture of your soldier’s service better.

Detailed information about the soldier.
I will look up information such as enlistment records, company, awards and other service records.

Detailed information surrounding the date of wounding, death or missing.
In case the soldier I have to research was Killed In Action or went Missing In Action, I will provide information surrounding the events and actions of the day he was killed.

The information for this soldier will be presented in a nice information package that I can email or, if you request so, mail to you. For this I am asking a voluntary donation to cover some of the costs I am making. If you wish to make a donation, please visit my donation page:


DONATE AND SUPPORT

Please note: I am not an “Official Historian”. I have a full time job, a family and all my research and writing is done in my spare time. I will try to get back to you as fast as possible, but sometimes it might take a couple of days. I have spent many hours, days and months studying reports, combat interviews, books, documentaries and maps to get a better view of the events that I am interested in. I have walked the former battlefields many times as well. As you can imagine, obtaining information such as reports and other personal information, requires some time. It is not always possible to find all the answers to our questions. It can be very frustrating at times when it takes months for me to find an answer to a certain question or to connect a certain event to a certain Company, but I will always share any information I can find with you.

REQUESTING OFFICIAL RECORDS YOURSELF: 

Requesting Individual Personnel Files

The National Personnel Records Center (NPRC), Military Personnel Records, has custody of the personnel files for individuals who served in the Army, Army Air Forces, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard during World War II.

In July 1973, a fire destroyed 85 percent of the Army and Army Air Forces individual personnel files, but the NPRC staff often is able to locate basic information relevant to a person’s service from other records in their custody. The fire did not affect records of the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard.

The preferred method of requesting information from NPRC is via the web at

http://vetrecs.archives.gov

(when you open this link, you will find a lot of useful information as well).
Written requests may be submitted on Standard Form 180 (SF 180), Request

Pertaining to Military Records, a form and other information about NPRC can be found at:

http://archives.gov/veterans/militaryservice-records/get-service-records.html

Requesting Individual Deceased Personnel Files (IDPF).

If you want to learn more about a soldier that was KIA or went MIA, you can request the IDPF. This is the Individual Deceased Personnel File (IDPF). The IDPF will almost always establish his unit and give information on his burial. In many cases, it will also give valuable information about where and when he died, possibly including reports of the action in which he died. For men whose remains were never recovered or identified, extremely valuable records of the testimonies of his buddies are usually included, giving extraordinary information about the action, what happened to him, and when they last saw him.

NOTE: You must send a letter before any information can be sent out to you. The letter should include your signed statement of willingness to pay the Freedom of Information Act fees for the work involved.

If you are requesting your relative’s IDPF, they may not charge you. It is not possible to request the files by just writing an email; you have to write a letter first.

Department of the Army
U.S. Army Human Resources Command
ATTN: AHRC-FOIA
1600 Spearhead Division Avenue, Dept. 107
Fort Knox, Kentucky 40122-5504
502-613-4400
usarmy.knox.hrc.mbx.foia@mail.mil

To request more information about a 9th Infantry Division soldier, please fill in the below contact form to send me a message. Thank you. Let’s never forget what these men have done for our freedom.

Yuri Beckers